Why Dogs need Crates?

Why Dogs Need Crates

 

Is a dog crate a prison or a cozy refuge where they can retreat to? 

 

The answer depends on the perspective with which you look at it. 

 

Naturally, dogs come with an instinct to retreat to a den that they consider safe, whenever they want to nap. 

 

Introducing your dog to a crate when they are still a puppy will automatically make them consider it their haven whenever they want some peace. 

It is essential to give your furry friend a space that he can consider his own whenever he wants to snooze. 

Crate training your dog will be beneficial to both you and the dog. 

 

The dog’s crate will give your dog his own private space whenever he is tired, stressed, or wants to be alone. 

 

A good example:

 

This particular dog thinks he is safe while inside the cage so mommy cannot punish him.

 

It is important to respect his time in the crate, and especially children, whether he went in there himself, or you sent him there. He should be left alone when he is in there since that is his time.

 

Dog crates are great at helping with house training in things such as bladder and bowel control. Dogs do not enjoy defecating where they sleep. 

 

Ensure that the crate is large enough for you to start your training efficiently. 

 

You won’t always have time to supervise your furry friend, and he could be up to something cheeky. For example, he could be playing underfoot while you’re cooking, and that could pose a hazard to both of you. Keeping him in a dog crate will ensure household safety and peace of mind.

 

Having your pet cage-trained would be more comfortable for him when he visits the vet and is required to spend the night there. He won’t be as stressed since his cage will be familiar to him, or he will quickly adapt to his cage.

 

Dogs love chewing almost everything they come across. Imagine getting home from work to find that he has been gnawing at your favorite chair– a disaster, right? This can be avoided by keeping your pet confined in his crate.

 

Emergencies or disasters usually happen without our prior knowledge. Having a dog crate means that you can keep him secure and avoid any unwanted messes. Even when he is handed over to someone else to care for him in the meantime, he will feel more relaxed being in a familiar setting with his favorite toys, blanket, and scent.

 

Your dog is a part of the family and will most likely enjoy going on outings with the rest of the family instead of leaving him alone at home. A dog crate provides the perfect opportunity for him to tag along. The crate also reduces the loneliness that comes with being left outdoors when you’re not at home. Being in a crate inside the house keeps him in more familiar surroundings, reducing stress.

 

Despite the advantages of dog crates, they can also be used the wrong way, resulting in the wrong results. Some of the things that are considered misusing dog crates and should be avoided include:

 

  • Many people make the mistake of using dog crates to punish their pets. This should be like his safe house, a place where they can relax, sleep, and hide from the world– the crate should never be used for punishment.
  • Leaving your dog in his crate for too long shouldn’t happen, and especially if they are still puppies. They need to go out to relieve themselves and stretch their legs regularly. This is the reason why doggy daycares are important. Dogs need plenty of exercises and playtime on a daily basis.

 

With the abovementioned information in mind, the question now is: how are dogs introduced to crates? Introducing dogs to crates is best done from the time they are puppies. Tossing things that they can chew on into the cage will keep them busy. They will even start going into the crates for naps on their own in hopes that something to chew will magically appear. With time, you can start leaving them in their crates for longer periods with the doors closed.

 

Crate training for adult dogs can be done in the same way, although it could take much longer since they will be more anxious. It might require a dog counselor’s help. Food is something that is usually used to lure pets into crates without them even realizing it.

 

With all this information, it is probably right to assume that the dog crate isn’t a prison, but rather a haven that is beneficial to both you and your dog. Try and start his crate training as early as possible so that he gets used to it sooner. 

Leave a Comment